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Time Tracking Hack: Toggl

Posted on May 17 2017 | Author: Poonam Patel

Start timer.

Whether you are an entrepreneur with your own start-up, an employee of a small business, or the CEO of a multinational corporation, understanding how your time is being spent can help optimize your productivity at work.

Tracking your time can tell you exactly how many hours you spend sending emails, reading articles, working on specific projects, or writing a blog. By logging your hours, you have a record of what you are spending the most time on and where you need to put in a bit more work. Knowing how you are spending your time will assist in planning and managing your time for the future.

Toggl is one of my favourite apps to keep track of how I spend my time at work because of how simple and user-friendly it is. Here are some features of Toggl that have helped me track my time and make my days more efficient.

Interactive One-click Time Tracking.

Just download the Toggl desktop app and open up the logger. With just one click, you can input what you are currently working on and the timer automatically starts recording. When you move onto a different task, simply enter the title of the next project and the timer will begin again. All your tasks of the day are listed in the logger, that way if you decide to stop a project and go back to it later, all you have to do is start the timer for that task again and toggle will sum it up for you.

Tracking Reminders.
It’s easy to get consumed in your work and forget to enter your projects into the app. That’s why Toggl allows you to set timed reminders for when and how often you would like a notification to track your hours. You can set it for every 30 minutes from 9am-5pm, Monday to Friday, to ensure that your entire workday gets recorded. This feature is especially helpful for new users who are just starting to use the app and have a hard time remembering to start the timer.

If you forget to start timer – that’s okay you can always manually add it in later.
 

Reports.
Toggl summarizes your time into a daily or weekly report with a detailed breakdown of time spent on each activity. This can be compared to previous weeks and be used to set realistic deadlines or allocate accurate time towards similar tasks in the future.


Pomodoro timer.

This is a feature that is based on a theory that people work best in 25-minute bursts with a 5-minute break in between. Toggl allows you to set your timers and schedule
your breaks to help maximize your productivity and efficiency throughout the day. The time intervals can also be customized to suit your personal workflow.

Unlimited projects.
Even with the free version of the app, you can log your hours for an unlimited number of projects or clients.

This app acts as a tool to keep track of how you are spending your time at work. It is important to keep a log of your hours but this is only useful if you analyze the data! Be sure to reflect on your time, compare your reports to previous logs, identify what time of day you are most productive, understand how long it takes to complete specific projects, and use all of this information to manage your time better in the future.
 

How Toggle has helped me.

1) Forces me to stay focused on the task at hand. Sometimes multi-tasking isn’t always the most productive way to work and time tracking allows me to focus my attention on a specific project without being distracted by my other tasks.

2) Helps me stay organized. Toggl allows me to keep track of all my on-going projects and clients to make sure none of them fall off the radar.

 3) Makes my to-do list more effective. I now add estimated times next to each of my tasks based on previously recorded Toggl times to plan my schedules and make my day more efficient.

End timer.

Blog – 1hour 56minutes added to timesheet.

Thank you Toggl!

* Toggl can be integrated directly into other productivity tools like Asana, Todoist, Trello (read our blog from last month) and many others!

 
Sources:
 
Poonam Patel
Analyst, Bioproducts 





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Outlook Hacks for Efficiency and Organization

Posted on May 08 2017 | Author: Laura Millson

As a project coordinator for many specialized tasks, managing and tracking emails is an interesting challenge, especially when coordinating multiple inboxes.  I receive emails with varying subject content from all facets of our organization and beyond. 

I would like to share a few functions that simplify my day. Give them a try to see if they work for you and share your feedback.

Often email conversations mask important references and attachments, but most importantly the “true subject” gets buried and is no longer part of the email subject line. Emails that you have been copied on, or forwarded can also become time wasters – having to open every email because the subject or focus is submerged.  It can all become confusing!

I routinely use a feature to edit subject lines.  This allows me to search more accurately and efficiently and makes filing precise and clear for others.

All emails with prefaces “ FW: or RE:” and all lengthy long subject lines do not add to the email …it becomes clutter.  In our busy days, we don’t have the time to read through multiple emails to find content.  You want the purpose…the point, the jist!

As a project coordinator, keeping track of emails can challenging, but there are a few tools I use that help me manage my “clutter”.  Let me begin by clarifying that my mouse is set up with a secondary click on the right side to give me quick access to features within Outlook 2011.

Here are my top Go-To’s….5 features to test out for yourself…

1. Edit the Subject Line.

Help manage your inbox and avoid inbox overload.

Click on an email and go to Message> Edit Message Edit Subject

Edit the subject line, close the window and it will update automatically in your inbox. This allows you to change the email subject line…try it once and you will use it every day!

 

2. Move Emails.

Store emails in folders directly from the inbox without dragging and dropping them in the wrong folder.

Click on an email and go to Message > Move

A list of recent folders or the option to choose a folder will appear. Alternatively, you could set up a rule for instant filing.

 

3. Flags and Reminders.

Flagging emails reminds me to check on action items by date – this creates a task list and is helpful for time sensitive reminders.

Your task list is generated as separate activity located under Calendar in your Outlook Navigation menu.

Click on an email and go to Message > Follow - Up

 

4. Forward an Email.

Quickly send an email as an attachment without the search, drag and drop delay.

Right click on the Message > Forward as an attachment

I use this in conjunction with ‘Editing the Subject Line’.

 

5. Create a Rule.

Set up a protocol for auto-delete of recurring emails or set unique criteria for filing, this is useful for subscription and industry references, newsletters or repetitive emails.

Click on an email and go to Message > Rules

At the end of the day, it’s about finding something helpful that works for you, makes your day productive, and gives you the confidence that everything is in its place. I hope you find value in my tried and true tricks for controlling, tracking and organizing.

 

Sources:

http://logonoid.com/images/outlook-logo.png

https://unsplash.com/collections/794479/do-more?photo=KE0nC8-58MQ

 

Laura Millson
Special Projects Coordinator






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Canada’s legalization of recreational cannabis – legislation introduced

Posted on May 01 2017 | Author: Admin

In the 2015 federal election, the Liberal Party of Canada ran on a platform that included legalizing recreational cannabis. Following the election, a task force was created to report on legalization and regulation, and a report was delivered in November 2016. On April 13, 2017, Bill C-45, An Act respecting cannabis and to amend the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Criminal Code and other Acts (the Cannabis Act) was introduced, largely implementing the task force’s recommendations. In a nutshell, it decriminalizes the possession of certain amounts of cannabis and makes allowance for production for commercial use.

The bill introduces a system of licensing and permitting for the production, distribution, and sale of “licit” cannabis; any cannabis produced, distributed or sold other than as permitted in the Cannabis Act or any provincial act is considered “illicit.” Good news to those who invested resources to submit applications for licensing under the medical marijuana regime (formerly the MMPR, now the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations[ACMPR]): the bill’s transitional provisions provide that any licence issued, or application in process under that regime will be deemed a licence or application under the Cannabis Act when it comes into force.

The bill does not speak to the mechanics of distribution. Instead, it provides that a person may possess, sell or distribute cannabis if that person is authorized to do so under a provincial act. The bill does note, though, that a person can only sell cannabis under a provincial act if the cannabis was produced by a person authorized under the Cannabis Act to produce for commercial purposes. Thus, we should expect additional information from the provinces regarding the model for sale of cannabis.

Of particular interest to some is whether or not any provincial legislation will allow distribution of medical cannabis by pharmacies – a hot issue when medicinal cannabis regulations were first introduced (currently, medicinal cannabis can only be distributed through the mail). The bill proposes that separate access to cannabis for medical purposes be maintained, and the ACMPR will continue to be in effect. It remains to be seen how, if at all, the soon-to-come provincial legislation will affect the distribution of medical cannabis.
 

Highlights of the bill are set out below

Licensing

The Cannabis Act provides for a licensing and permit scheme for the production, testing, packaging, labeling, sending, delivery, transportation, sale, possession or disposal of commercial cannabis. Although details will be governed by yet-to-be-developed regulations, it appears the process will be similar to that currently in place under the ACMPR. Requirements will likely relate primarily to safety and security, and provide product standards for cannabis sold.

As set out above, the bill provides that several types of licenses and permits issued or applied for under other acts and regulations at the date the new act comes into force will be deemed to be issued under the Cannabis Act. These include producers licenses, import and export permits, and security clearances issued under the ACMPR as well as narcotic dealers licenses for those that deal in cannabis under the Narcotic Control Regulations.

It is proposed that cannabis can only be imported or exported pursuant to a license, and only then for medical or scientific purposes.

What can be sold

Only cannabis produced pursuant to a license can be sold, and products containing cannabis in combination with nicotine, caffeine or alcohol will be prohibited. The government anticipates that on the coming into force of theCannabis Act commercial products will be limited to fresh and dried cannabis, cannabis oil, seeds and plants. Further regulation may allow for the sale of edibles and other products; however, these are not anticipated to be in place initially.

Packaging & labeling

Packaging and labeling requirements will be determined primarily by yet-to-be-developed regulations. The bill provides that packaging must not be false, misleading or deceptive, and it must also not be appealing to young persons, contain testimonials or endorsements, depict persons or characters, or associate a product with certain lifestyle imagery.

Advertising

The bill permits information-type promotion, restricted to factual and accurate information about cannabis products (ingredients, THC and CBD levels, etc.). Information enabling consumers to tell the difference between brands will also be permitted. Promotion is only allowed where it will not be seen by young persons.

There are proposed restrictions on advertising relating to sponsorships, endorsements, and testimonials, price, depiction of persons or characters, lifestyle advertising, and advertising in a way that could be appealing to young persons. The Cannabis Act provides for regulation-making powers and regulations could affect what is permitted or require the inclusion of specific information such as health risk information.

Tax

It is expected the government will amend the Excise Tax Act to tax cannabis. The task force report suggested taxing higher-potency THC at a higher rate, and using revenue generated from cannabis sales for drug prevention, education and treatment goals.
 

Next steps

The Government of Canada has set a target date of July 2018 for a recreational cannabis market; however, Bill C-45 has only just been introduced and must be passed by both houses. Further, many aspects of the regulatory regime will be determined by regulations that need to be drafted and published. There are therefore no guarantees as to if, when, or how cannabis will be legalized and regulated. Until the Cannabis Act is in force, existing laws remain in place and the provisions discussed above are subject to change.

 

Ian Trimble
Associate, Norton Rose Fullbright

Jacob Cawker
Associate, Norton Rose Fullbright

Sara Zborovski
Partner, Norton Rose Fullbright

 

Article provided by Norton Rose Fulbright

 

About Norton Rose Fulbright
Norton Rose Fulbright is a global legal practice that provides the world's pre-eminent corporations and financial institutions with a full business law service. Norton Rose Fulbright lawyers share food and agribusiness sector knowledge and experience across provincial and national borders, enabling them to support their clients anywhere in the world. To learn more about Norton Rose Fulbright, please visit www.nortonrosefulbright.com

 

Click here to view the original article.






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