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Category Specific Guidance Finalized: Temporary Marketing Authorization for Supplemented Food

Posted on August 31 2016 | Author: Admin

Supplemented Food guidance document has been finalized by the Food Directorate with an extension for Supplemented Food TMAL holders

In addition to the Caffeinated Energy Drink (CED) guidance document that was finalized in 2013, the Food Directorate has published the long awaited final Temporary Marketing Authorization for Supplemented Food Guidance Document this past February. This guidance document has been long awaited by both companies currently developing new formulations, since it provides guidance on acceptable quantities of vitamins and minerals that may be added to a supplemented food, but also by companies whom currently hold TMALs set to expire August 31, 2016.


A few interesting highlights of this new guide are as follows:

  • Definition: Supplemented food has been defined as “a pre-packaged product that is manufactured, sold or represented as a food, which contains added vitamins, minerals, amino acids, herbal or bioactive ingredients. These ingredients may perform a physiological role beyond the provision of nutritive requirements.” A key point here is that it is now permissible to submit a product through the TMA process that contains only herbal or bioactive ingredients (with no vitamin or mineral fortification) for review. Additionally, the guide provides a subset of novel ingredients that are being permitted in the TMA pathway as per Appendix 2 of this guidance document, see more on this below.
  • Extension: TMALs set to expire on August 31, 2016 have received an extension to comply with the new guide until February 22, 2017. Although to maintain market access beyond February 22, 2017 you must be compliant with this guide, as well as any other applicable Food and Drug Regulations provisions and provide an updated copy of the TMA and label with a letter outlining the revisions to the formula by August 31, 2016. Acceptable products will then be extended until December 31, 2021.
  • 2 Pathway system: Supplemented foods will now be categorized into a pathway system based on the potential for adverse effects. In short the 2 pathways are as follows:
    • Path 1 – Intended for a general subpopulation (children ≥4 years old) with maximum levels of addition of ingredients based on a per serving
    • Path 2 – Intended for a subpopulation  ≥14 years old with maximum levels of addition of ingredients based on a per day. This pathway will also have a threshold for vitamin and mineral fortification which when exceed will trigger specific cautionary labelling statements.
  • Revision to vitamins and minerals not accepted for addition: Consistent with the feedback that Health Canada provided in several regulatory sessions, they have amended the list of ingredients not permitted for addition. Importantly calcium and manganese have been removed from this section and are now permitted in Path 2 (products not intended for children) supplemented food products in quantities specified in this guide.
  • Novel Ingredients: Appendix 2 of this guidance document has now been populated with specific novel ingredients that are eligible for consideration in a supplemented food product. Although, it is worth noting that when an ingredient from this Appendix is added, the Food Directorate cannot commit to the timelines outlined in their performance standards guidance document, and it could delay the TMAL significantly.
  • Unique Identifier: No definitive guidance has been provided yet, but Health Canada has indicated that they are exploring the possibility of a front-of-pack identifier on the label of supplemented foods so that consumers can easily identify them. Health Canada has currently developed several options, which have not yet been disclosed, and will test them with consumers.
  • Market Research Protocol (MRP): For companies that have already received TMALs they may be aware that they are required to provide data in the form of a MRP on their product to address data gaps to aid in the development of specific regulations for supplemented foods. While TMAL holders of Caffeinated Energy Drinks have been advised that they are expected to prepare a MRP and collect data in accordance with this protocol, supplemented food holders had not yet been advised that they must begin this requirement. Once a TMAL holder of a supplemented food receives their final extension, as discussed above, they will be advised of their expected research requirements to fulfil this obligation in their Letter of Agreement.

In summary, the finalized Supplemented Food guidance document is an overdue, appreciated guidance regarding the requirements of a fortified food (outside of foods that are already permitted to be fortified in the Food and Drug Regulations). This guidance should help many companies develop unique and novel products that have a legal path to market without worry of Health Canada reformulation requests.
 

Article provided by dicentra

About dicentra
dicentra provides sought-after food safety guidance, compliance consulting services and scientific guidance for food and health-related products sold in North American marketplaces. Since 2002, dicentra has been helping clients resolve complex scientific and safety issues, develop safe and effective market-leading products and facilitate timely regulatory approvals. To learn more about dicentra, please visit www.dicentra.com

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The New Age of Advertising

Posted on August 24 2016 | Author: Admin

Facebook, Twitter and many other channels have millions of users, so why not take advantage?

Social media advertising is dramatically shaking up the marketing industry. With lower costs, higher returns and available reporting metrics, it seems obvious why countless organizations are focusing on this outlet. Social media advertising allows you to deliver the right message, to the right people, at the right time.

The most revolutionary and unique aspect of social media advertising is the number of target selections available to focus on a specific group of individuals. Below are just a few examples of the possible target options:

  • Age
  • Gender
  • Language
  • Education
  • Interests
  • Friends
  • Relationship Status
  • Actions Taken
  • Occupation
  • Location
  • Friends of Friends
  • Job Title



Advertising budgets can go a long way over social media. With the benefit of spending as much or as little as you’d like, it helps enhance the quality and reach of your campaigns, to promote your brand to the right audience. Primarily, targeted advertisements should be your focus, but also note that it is important to create blanket-marketing messages that appeal to a wider group of people as well.


Determine An Outcome
Before creating your campaign; outline your goals and objectives to best tailor your advertisement. Monitor and analyze the channel’s metrics frequently to determine if these goals are being met.

The three most important metrics are below and they display how your campaign is performing:

  • Click through rate (CTR): Measures the number of clicks on your advertisement VS. the number of impressions received (clicks divided by impressions). This shows how relevant your content is to your audience as well as traffic quality. Higher is better.
  • Conversion Rate: Tracking the landing page visits from your campaign provides an idea of the quality of clicks it is receiving, which can help to better develop content for future campaigns. Calculate by dividing conversions by number of clicks. Higher is better.
  • Cost Per Conversion (CPC): Each campaign should have a clear goal or call-to-action (ex. Newsletter signups, sales, web traffic, etc.). To calculate the return on investment of your goal, divide the amount of money spent by the number of conversions (provided in your metrics). This assesses your campaign’s profitability and also helps determine a potential future budget. Lower is better.


Choose A Channel
Each platform offers various tools and reporting outcomes. Therefore, analyzing which is the most appropriate for your marketing objectives is essential for success.

Facebook

  • Pro: Facebook is a great option for small businesses because it has the largest audience and can easily boost visibility for the company and its advertisements. Also, it has many targeting options such as: gender, location, education, workplace and relationship status that help reach the right individuals more accurately.
  • Con: Compared to other channels, Facebook provides minimal information for reporting on the performance of your campaigns.
  • Cost: This is one of the most cost effective channels, with the option to spend as little as $1 per day.

Twitter

  • Pro: Twitter has the target option to reach people based on their current interests. Using hashtags helps target the advertisements more specifically, similar to Google Adwords.
  • Con: Despite the convenience of hasthags, other Twitter advertising options do not offer the same ease, with a limited selection of targets to choose from.
  • Cost: There are three different options, but the most frequent and least expensive is promoting tweets.  For approximately $0.5-$2.00 per engagement (retweet, favourite, click, etc.), you can boost the reach of a tweet you wish to promote.

LinkedIn

  • Pro: The best aspect of LinkedIn advertising is the user base, which are mainly business professionals. Similar to Facebook, you have the ability to target specific groups through location, titles and demographics, for example.
  • Con: Although there is a higher conversion rate, this platform provides a very low click through rate. Generally, the users behind the clicks are much more qualified than compared to other social media networks.
  • Cost: LinkedIn is one of the more costly networks, averaging of up to $4-5 per click.  However, since it hosts a greater audience quality, your campaign reaches only those who are immediately interested, which may be worth the extra cost.


Create an Advertisement
Now that you’ve determined your campaign goals and the appropriate channel to use, you can begin to create your advertisement. Consider the following when developing the campaign:

  • Be consistent: Create the ad so its parallel with your company message and culture
  • Be informal: Use language that is similar to how your audience converses over social media
  • Be honest: Display your brands uniqueness and culture so your advertisements appear genuine
  • Be concise: You only have a few moments to grab their attention so be sure to make a good impression
  • Be obvious: Incorporate a call-to-action, make it clear what you want them to do
  • Be visual: Always include images for a greater impact and the potential to increase click through rates

Advertising through social media has created endless possibilities. To use it effectively, you need to be frequently engaged, create quality resources for your audience and analyze the metrics provided. Only by analyzing your outcomes and productively utilizing the appropriate channels, will your company be able to refine its voice on social media and truly communicate with the right audience.

Rebecca Reynolds
Marketing & Events Assistant

 

Sources
www.pennapowers.com
www.hootsuite.com
www.hubspot.com


 






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Nurturing Relationships with Sponsors

Posted on August 10 2016 | Author: Kelly Laidlaw

Congratulations! You created an attractive service offering that provides great benefits to corporate sponsors.  Next, you entered into formal business partnerships with corporate sponsors. But how do you nurture these relationships so that they last? Below are some ways to ensure long-term, mutually beneficial partnerships with your valued sponsors.

Know your sponsors. Take the time to truly understand their short-term and long-term strategic business goals in order to help them succeed. Also, learning their preferred communication style (phone, email, face-to-face, etc.) will help to enhance communication and strengthen your partnership.

Don’t play favourites. Make it a priority to treat each sponsor fairly regardless of company size or sponsorship level. Maintaining a list or chart to track the benefits that each sponsor has received will ensure that everyone is presented with equal opportunities. Also, it’s important to set clear expectations about how you’ll approach competitors.

Set clear expectations. This will help minimize disappointments and misunderstandings to ensure that both parties are in agreement of what the partnership entails. Manage any conflict that should arise with grace, and your relationship could grow stronger because of it.

Be thoughtful. Seemingly small things such as pronouncing names correctly and remembering birthdays go a long way to show that you value and appreciate your business relationships.

Promote your sponsors. You partnered with your sponsors because you believe in their company, so let your network know how much you value the partnership. This could lead to mutually beneficial relationships between those in your network and your sponsors. Promoting your sponsors on social media (LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, etc.) websites, newsletters, blogs, events, and by word of mouth will provide your sponsors with recognition and industry visibility to a target audience that they may otherwise not have the chance to reach.

Be honest and transparent. Let your sponsors know what you’re up to by sharing your success stories, sending them your company newsletters, and inviting them to attend industry events with you. All of these are opportunities to build your relationship while letting your sponsors understand your mission. Plus, sharing this information with your sponsor may spark new ideas for collaboration.

Ask for feedback. Check in with your sponsors frequently to ensure that they’re getting what they need from the partnership, and ask if there is any room for improvement. This may develop into a great opportunity to discuss new ideas or to discover additional ways that you could collaborate. 

Treating your sponsors with honesty and respect, while returning value to the sponsors, is a surefire way to ensure your valued relationships last.

 

Kelly Laidlaw
Program Manager, Corporate Relations
 






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