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How to access the Bioenterprise Seed Fund

Posted on January 11 2018 | Author: Jessica Bowes

Things to consider: Applicant eligibility, project criteria, matching funds, and mentorship opportunities

In March of 2016, Bioenterprise was awarded $4.84 Million from FedDev Ontario’s Investing in Business Innovation (IBI) program to deliver services to support early-stage innovation and commercialization in Southern Ontario’s agriculture and agri-food industries.

The program is co-delivered with Innovation Guelph, a regional accelerator, which provides services to innovative companies in the advanced manufacturing and social innovation sectors. This continues to be an exciting partnership that has increased accessibility to expertise and resources critical for success in the sectors identified above.

For the last three years, both organizations have worked collaboratively to support start-ups and SMEs successfully move along the commercialization path, allowing them to grow through the generation of revenues, job creation, and add-on investment. Support activities include mentorship, access to specialized technical expertise and/or industry-specific business advisory services, as well as access to seed financing.

With the fourth open call for proposals launching January 11th, here are a few considerations for the application process.

Applicant eligibility

To be eligible for this Program, companies must be:

  • Headquartered in Southern Ontario

  • Incorporated in Ontario or federally

  • Innovative and/or have a unique agricultural or agri-food innovation

  • Able to demonstrate matching funds up to a maximum of $30,000 in order to receive seed

    funding

  • Able to demonstrate benefit to provincial agriculture and/or the producer-processor

    communities

  • Able to, or have potential to, address Canadian or North American markets

Companies must not have previously accessed other IBI seed funding programs. A complete list of these programs can be found in the Program Guide.

Project criteria

Eligible companies can apply for seed financing on a project basis, seeking matching funds up to $30,000.

In order to be considered, applicants must clearly describe the purpose of the project, or problem being addressed, as well as projected outcomes relating to the overall growth strategy of the company through a formalized application process. Projected impact on revenues, job creation, potential for investment, and cost savings related to water, waste, or energy will be crucial considerations.

There are ten (10) eligible project types, including:

  • Business Management & Strategy

  • Technical Expertise Development (IT or Engineering)

  • Leadership Training

  • Talent Recruitment

  • Branding & Marketing

• Process Efficiency & Optimization
• New Product Development
• Prototyping & Product Piloting
• B2B Sales & Business Development • Investment Readiness & Preparation

Applicants will also be asked to develop a Project Milestone Plan and Activity Budget to support the project objectives. For more information regarding eligible activities and the application process please click here to view the 2018 Bioenterprise Seed Funding Program Guide.

Matching funds

Seed financing is available on a 1:1 matching basis, and will be provided if the applicant provides a financial statement or a letter from their financial institution demonstrating matching funds up to a maximum of $30,000.

Mentorship and commercialization support services

The final, and potentially the most important consideration for the Bioenterprise Seed Fund refers to mentorship and commercialization support services that are available to applicants.

Eligible applicants will be connected to the appropriate sector-specific Analyst who will provide feedback on the project plan outlined in the Letter of Intent (LOI) in preparation for development of the full application. LOI’s will be accepted until February 13, 2018.

Successful LOI applicants will be invited to complete a full application, which will be accepted until 2:30 pm EST on February 20, 2018. If interested, please get connected or apply today.

Sources:
Guelph Tribune
Ontario Farmer

Jessica Bowes
Manager Business & Technology Analyst Group






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Exporting to the European Union

Posted on January 04 2018 | Author: Alex Mitro

As small and medium enterprises (SMEs) expand their businesses and explore new markets for their products, many begin to consider exporting to the European Union (EU) and its Member States. Since the EU is treated as a single market with access to 28 Member States (of which, 19 share the same currency), the potential market access is appealing. This is very applicable within the agriculture and food technology sector, which was estimated to be $2.4 billion dollars in 2013. However, the export process can be challenging as each Member State retains the right to dictate their own tax, importation laws and fees on all imported products.

The goal of this blog is to provide an overview of some of the requirements you will be asked to comply with when exporting to the EU as well as some of the available resources that may assist you and your company throughout the export process.

Every importable product within the EU has a specific Combined Nomenclature (CN) code, which is comprised of 10-digits. The first six digits are specific to the product code system implemented globally, known as the Harmonized System (HS) (sometimes referred to as a Taric code). The product CN code, which is specific to only the EU, is required to be present on all exporting documents as it indicates whether or not the product can enter the target Member State and what importation fees are placed on the product. To classify your products’ HS and CN codes, the EU Taxation and Customs Union and the Canada Post websites, are great resources for doing so. Some products may be harder than others to classify due to the nature of the product and in these situations contacting a Customs Trade Commissioner might be the best solution. They can be contacted at any time to assist you in obtaining the correct CN number for your product, as well as guide you through the exporting process and answer any additional questions you may have about exporting in general.

To find your products HS code, follow the provided link.

Once you have obtained the correct CN code for your product, you are able to use the EU’s Taric system to determine the EU importation restrictions and tariff fees (importation fees and associated taxes) placed on your product in each EU Member State. This is exceptionally helpful in determining which EU countries you may consider expanding to first, as well as what additional export documentation may be required to do so. In addition to the product CN code, all products exported to the EU must also be accompanied by a commercial invoice, detailing the items packaged in the shipment; a CETA Declaration of Origin; a B13 Export Declaration Form, if the product is valued over $2000 CN, and any other supporting documents that may be required on a Member State-specific basis. The commercial invoice containing all of this information can either be self-created or can be generated by regulatory and compliance company who specializes in exporting.

Furthermore, many companies and treaties have been established to assist SMEs with successfully exporting their products to the EU. To name a few:

  • The Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) is an established free-trade agreement between Canada, the EU, and its Member States that allows almost all products to receive a reduced (and sometimes zeroed) tariff, minimizing the costs associated with exporting.

  • Export Development Canada (EDC) was also established to provide small companies with insurance and financial assistance when exporting to new markets by providing access to more capital during the process.

  • Other industry-specific initiatives exist as well, for example, the Canadian Food Exporters Association (CFEA) assists companies in the food, beverage and ingredient product industry to increase their total export sales through improved marketing and business strategy development.

Although exporting to the EU can be complicated, knowing your products CN and HS code, properly preparing the export documentation, understanding the services and programs available to assist you through the process and having a general understanding of the EU export landscape will greatly simplify the process.

Sources:
The Canadian Trade Commissioner Service
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
EDC

Alex Mitro
Junior Analyst, Escarpment Labs
Bioenterprise Recent Graduate & Mentorship Program






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Food Fax

Posted on December 20 2017 | Author: Admin

Read the lasted Food Fax newsletter from International Food Focus Ltd.’s President, Carol Culhane.  

 

©2016 International Food Focus Ltd., 211 Carlton Street, East Office, Toronto, ON M5A 2K9 E: focus@foodfocus.on.ca
Food Fax is archived at www.foodfocus.on.ca 






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The Smart Barn: Precision Agriculture in the Dairy Industry

Posted on December 01 2017 | Author: Liam Polsky

The growing global demand for animal protein has resulted in an increased number of animals raised on Canadian farms. Further consolidation and integration of various livestock industries have caused an increase in the number of animals per farm, coinciding with a decrease in the availability of quality farming staff. Precision agriculture, the use of automated mechanical and electronic equipment to reduce human labour, is being adopted rapidly, as farmers are now able to continuously monitor and access animal-level data anytime, anywhere. Precision agriculture has become integral to farm operations including animal identification, feeding, milking, reproductive management, egg collection, cleaning and hygiene, as well as managing barn environmental conditions. As a result, farmers are saving time, require less labour, and improving yield, safety and efficiency. The improved traceability of products, as well as selective ability for preferred farm management practices. Ultimately, the true benefit of precision livestock management is the various technology's ability to monitor individual animals, allowing farmers and veterinarians to tailor services directly, and not to the entire animal population.

What kind of precision livestock products are being used today?

Animal Identification and Behaviour:
Animal identification is an integral part of livestock management, as it is important for production and performance records, biosecurity, health and reproduction management, and financial bookkeeping. Classically, branding was the most unique way to identify an animal, but the inability to distinguish individual animals, time to brand, as well as animal welfare concerns, have made this system archaic. The most common identification technologies are based on Radio Frequency Identification systems (RFID) or accelerometers.

RFID: This system is comprised of a transponder, receiver, and software that communicate through a digital network. The transponder is a tag worn by the animal usually in the ear, is activated by the signal broadcasted by the antenna on the receiver. The antenna emits radio frequency signals in a relatively short range, and once in communication with the transponder, can identify the animal, and then record information such as; time spent feeding, amount of feed/water consumed, time spent milking, or animal weight. Once the data has been accumulated and stored, the processing software turns this information into recognizable and useful format for the farmer.

Accelerometers: An accelerometers is an electromechanical device that will measure acceleration forces, and is able to determine the spatial orientation of the device, as well as the object's moving speed. This information can be translated into quantification of the animal's physical behaviour, and can be built out into a daily activity profile. Individual accelerometers worn by each animal allows the software to build a specific behaviour index for each animal, allowing farmers and veterinarians to manage and provide proactive health services for animals based on any deviation from their baseline index. In livestock husbandry, an animal's behaviour profile has been used to determine health status, reproductive readiness, weight gain and physical profile, as well as welfare indicators, such as amount of movement, and standing and lying time.

Automatic feeding systems have become increasingly popular across the farming landscape, due to their ability to ease workload, save time, and manage larger groups of animals. Automatic feeders are popular in poultry and swine production, as well as dairy and beef farming. Farmers have reported that their animals are less stressed during feed delivery, as less dominant animals are able to have improved access to more quantities of better feed. Moreover, automatic feeders are able to complement the animal's natural behaviours as the cows are able to eat at their desired times, as opposed to the farm worker's schedule.

Automatic milking systems have been commercially available since the early 1990s, and have been considered to be one of the biggest innovations in the dairy industry. Automatic milking systems use laser-guided teat position sensors, a robotic arm for automatic teat-cup application, and a gate system to control cow traffic. The voluntary milking system allows the cow to decide her own milking time and interval, as opposed to being milked as part of a group at set times. A large majority of farmers have viewed their transition to automatic milking systems as successful, citing decrease mastitis and lameness rates, as well as improvement in farming work-life management.

Innovation has been sweeping through the livestock industry at increasing speeds, with every component of farming becoming increasingly automated. The technological adaptation has changed how the farmers care for their animals, as they are now integrating large amounts of data to make individual based decisions. Ultimately, farm management has shifted from an art to an app, with more accessible data. In the second blog series, I will expand on the shifting relationship between the farmer and animal through increased husbandry innovation, and how animal welfare, consumer perceptions, and farming management will help guide the future of livestock innovation.


Sources:
Hamandani, H. and Khan, A.A., 2015. Automation in livestock farming-A technological revolution. International Journal (Toronto, Ont), 3:1335-1344.
Tse, C., Barkema, H.W., DeVries, T.J., Rushen, J. and Pajor, E.A., 2017. Effect of transitioning to automatic milking systems on producers' perceptions of farm management and cow health in the Canadian dairy industry. Journal of dairy science, 100:2404-2414.


Liam Polsky 
Analyst, Animal Health






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Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference: A Powerful Source for Growth

Posted on November 20 2017 | Author: Hanne Nauwelaerts

The majority of my work experience has been obtained on my family farm. Growing up and working in this environment motivated me to pursue  an education in agriculture; I am currently a third-year Food and Agricultural Business student at the University of Guelph. This past summer I completed my first co-op work term as Operations Assistant at a farrow-to-finish hog operation. In this role I was responsible for managing QuickBooks, creating an Environmental Farm Plan, and developing a Nutrient Management Strategy. Since then, my passion for agriculture has led me to my second co-op work term and current position at Bioenterprise Corporation where I am the Strategic Partnerships Assistant. I work alongside the Program Manager, Corporate Relations to support the Bioenterprise Partnership and Membership Programs to help agri-tech entrepreneurs grow their business. The learning opportunities that I have been exposed to in this role allowed me to realize the great possibilities that exist within agriculture.

As part of my role as Strategic Partnerships Assistant, I was invited to join the organization's Farmer Connection Taskforce (Ag Connection); a committee where producers, entrepreneurs and academia join forces to develop new innovations in agriculture. Since connecting with producers and industry representatives is a critical component of this committee, my supervisor and the rest of the Farmer Connection Taskforce team encouraged me to participate in the Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference Student program.

Iris Meck Communications Inc., the creator and host of the event, seeks companies to sponsor young women in agriculture studies at Canadian universities and colleges to attend the Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference. The conference provides students with excellent skills and tools needed to be an effective leader, examples of future careers, and networking opportunities with producers, entrepreneurs, board members and executives. In turn, students are asked to describe their education, previous work experience, why they are interested in attending the conference, and how they expect the conference to benefit their career objectives. I was fortunate enough to be chosen as one of the students to attend this event and incredible learning experience.

Attending the Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference allowed me to once again verify that I am on the right path, as agriculture is a great industry to be a part of. One of the most significant references that stood out to me was a quote by Mrs. Ngoma that Maimouna Abbass of Woods Empire Investments shared during her presentation: "Once or twice in life you need a doctor or a lawyer, but you need a farmer three times a day." This important concept was mentioned more than once throughout the conference. Jolene Brown, a farmer and family business consultant, delivered an engaging presentation and pointed out "if it weren't for agriculture and farmers, we'd all be hungry and naked." From Amanda Elzinga- Pugh, an Account Manager at Merck Animal Health, I learned that setting goals that seem unachievable push you out of your comfort zone. When setting S.M.A.R.T. goals, she suggests replacing realistic with risk-taking. This goes hand in hand with Jolene Brown's reminder that "if we always do that we've always done, we will be out of business." This new approach to goal setting will not only have a direct impact on your personal growth, it also has the ability to positively impact your community as it will open doors to new possibilities. Overall, the speakers that presented at the event offered quality advice to women in agriculture.

In conclusion, the Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference exposed me to valuable networking opportunities and speakers who have made great advances in agriculture. Due to this exceptional experience, I would highly recommend this event to women looking to enter the agricultural industry. The conference is a great source of inspiration that has the power to motivate anyone in attendance to grasp the opportunities available to women in agriculture. I would, therefore, like to take this time to thank Iris Meck and her team for organizing such a significant and inspiring event.

The Advancing Women in Agriculture Conference took place on October 30th and 31st at the Hilton/ Fallsview Casino in Niagara Falls.


Hanne Nauwelaerts
Strategic Partnership Assistant






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Working Virtually with Technology

Posted on November 10 2017 | Author: Alex Hurley

In the digital age, it's increasingly common for businesses to lean more heavily on technology. This transition has allowed for increased communication, productivity and overall employee happiness. Technology has made it possible for employees to work remotely, whether that be from satellite offices, home, or the ability to work virtually for collaborations. This movement is accomplished through text, video, and audio applications. The goal of this blog post is to outline some excellent applications that you may not of heard of, which could be significantly useful for your team when working virtually.

1. Slack: Slack is a free communication application and is used often in the start-up world. Slack allows team members to chat and share files with ease. It is a robust application where a user can privately chat with a team member or have group chats on a particular project. If the company is completely virtual, the user could create a channel for off topic discussion to facilitate water cooler conversation. What you might not know about Slack is that it also integrates a high-quality video chat, audio chat, and screen sharing. In the chat window on Slack, click the telephone icon in the top right and it will open an audio call with the team member. If a user would like to share your camera or screen, they can do so. These features can be used in team chats as well but a subscription fee is required.
 

2. Zoom: Zoom is a web conference application that excels in video conferencing and webinars. The base model for zoom is free, however if a user has specific needs, they have the ability to upgrade to certain packages for a fee. Zoom is dynamic yet simple to operate. Once a user logs in under their account, they can start a video conference. Once the conference has begun, a link is generated. Anyone they share that link with can join the chat. Zoom conferences incorporate both video and audio chat, which allows for flexibility. If an invitee doesn't have access to a computer or Wi-Fi, they can simply call into the meeting. Zoom also allows for the ability to share screens and record meetings, which is useful when giving presentations or webinars.
 

3. TeamViewer: TeamViewer is a remote connection application that uses cloud-based technology. The base model is free if it's for personal use only, however if a corporation would like to use TeamViewer, a license needs to be purchased. TeamViewer works under a basic premise- a user who wishes to remote connect to another computer sends a link, and the user on the computer to be connected to, opens the link and accepts the invite to remote connect. TeamViewer is extremely useful in situations where an application or computer needs to undergo troubleshooting to solve a particular issue or to replicate a particular bug. The business package offered by TeamViewer is an affordable way for technology start-ups to troubleshoot user bug reports, if they arise.
 

Even though I operate out of the Halifax satellite office, I have the ability to work closely with the excellent Bioenterprise team by making use of invaluable applications, like those outlined above. 

Sources: http://ow.ly/3h0k30guybN

Alex Hurley
Analyst, Aquacultre






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Bioenterprise B.C. hosts Vancouvers First Agri-Tech Pitch Night

Posted on October 25 2017 | Author: Jessica Taylor

Agri-tech and agri-food companies from across the Lower Mainland came together on October 18th for Vancouver’s first Agri-tech Pitch Night! The event was co-hosted by Bioenterprise B.C. and Volition Events to provide companies with the opportunity to receive feedback and coaching on their 3-minute pitch.

“This was a great opportunity to showcase British Columbia’s growing agri-tech and food sector,” said Jessica Taylor, A/Regional Manager of Bioenterprise B.C. “ The sector is growing rapidly and B.C. has such a unique ecosystem of support for these types of ventures. Companies need more opportunities like this for both feedback and exposure.”

It’s not often that entrepreneurs have the chance to practice their pitch in front of an expert panel and receive constructive criticism and recommendations.  Each panellist provided a unique perspective, and while feedback varied they provided some great tips that entrepreneurs should remember:

1. Bait the Hook: whether you have 5 minutes or 30 seconds, your pitch is meant to pique the interest of investors and other potential partners. Don’t worry about telling them all of the details, that’s what the follow-up conversation is for.

2. Ask!: Whether or not you are doing a raise be sure to let the audience know what you are looking for. Do you need a mentor? Connections to strategic partners?

3. Be Clear: Make sure that your innovation, competitive advantage, and ask are all very apparent to the audience. Practice and receive feedback as often as possible.

 

The pitch night brought together several companies within the ag-tech sector, including:  500 Foods, Burnaby Organic Greenhouse, Coast Protein, Compy, Hagensborg Chosolates (Truffle Pig), MyFoods Market, NuWave Research Inc., and Wise Bites.

Winners from Pitch Night were selected by an audience vote following the company pitches. The top three placing’s included:

 

Sustainable cricket protein powders and bars

 

 

Sustainable and ethically sourced chocolates

 

                    

On-site solutions in vacuum microwave dehydration for food






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Dietary Supplement Claim Substantiation What Evidence is Stipulated by Law?

Posted on October 20 2017 | Author: Admin

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires that a notification from the manufacturer, packager or distributor of a dietary supplement for the claim statements made on product labels is submitted to the FDA no later than 30 days after the first marketing of the product [1]. With this said, dietary supplement claim substantiations in the U.S. are not scientifically reviewed and approved for acceptability prior to entering the market. This is different from some other markets where claim statements are subject to substantiation requirements and pre-market approval. Companies in the dietary supplement industry are responsible for keeping on file the substantiation for all claims made on their labels. However, they may struggle with what type of evidence is suitable for substantiation. This leads us to the Regulations – what does the law require for the substantiation of dietary supplement claims?

Under Section 403(r)(6) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) (21 U.S.C. 343(r)(6))[2], a manufacturer of a dietary supplement making a nutritional deficiency, structure/function, or general well-being claim is required to have substantiation that the claim is truthful and not misleading. In the Act itself, there is no mention of the type of evidence required for substantiation. However, the FDA provides some guidance as to their current thinking regarding suitable substantiation claims for dietary supplements in a guidance document titled “Guidance for Industry: Substantiation for Dietary Supplement Claims Made Under Section 403 (r)(6) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act[3]. This guidance document demonstrates the FDA’s position for evidence requirements: “Although there is no pre-established formula as to how many or what type of studies are needed to substantiate a claim, we, like the FTC, will consider what the accepted norms are in the relevant research fields and consult experts from various disciplines.”

In this guidance document, the FDA specifies evidence which may substantiate a claim: (a) Human studies: Intervention studies (note: “randomized, double-blind, parallel group, placebo-controlled trials offer the greatest assessment of a relationship between a dietary supplement and outcome”), and/or (b) Human studies: Observational studies (includes Case reports, Case-series studies, Case-control studies, Cohort studies, Cross-sectional studies, Time-series studies, and Epidemiological studies.

Importantly, the FDA also discusses what types of additional information may be useful as background information to support a claim, but alone may not be adequate to substantiate a claim: Animal studies; In vitro studies; Testimonials and other anecdotal evidence; Meta-analysis; Review articles; Comments and Letters to the Editor or Product monographs.

The FDA’s guidance document provides the administration’s current thinking on evidence for dietary supplement claims but it is not legally binding because the Act does not list evidence requirements for substantiation. Therefore, appropriate/acceptable evidence for claims is not definitive and what is considered ‘scientifically sound and reliable’ evidence may be different depending on the nature of the claim and the message it conveys to consumers.   Therefore, companies marketing dietary supplements need to be confident in their claim substantiation in order to prevent any disputes with the FDA and FTC.

Overall, it is advisable to ensure your substantiation is reviewed for appropriateness by a scientific & regulatory expert who is capable of assessing the scientific evidence in the relevant research field for the type of the claim statement being made on your label. If you do not have someone in-house capable of doing so, then you may want to consult with a third-party for assistance to ensure you have appropriate dietary supplement claim substantiation.

dicentra can assist in reviewing evidence for dietary supplement claims to ensure that customers have the right type of evidence and substantiation documentation on-hand for dietary supplements for the U.S. market.

Sources:
[1] FDA Structure/Function Claim Notification for Dietary Supplements
[2] The Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act). (21 U.S.C. 343(r) (6)).
[3] Guidance for Industry: Substantiation for Dietary Supplement Claims Made Under Section 403 (r)(6) of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, Dec 2008.

View original blog here.






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Should I Patent This Blog?

Posted on October 03 2017 | Author: Michael Coulson

So, you think your new widget is the greatest thing since sliced bread. Like many others, you might think a patent is the logical next step to commercializing your invention, and you may be right. However, determining whether it makes business sense to patent is a complex issue, as are most legal matters. Here are a few of the many considerations to keep in mind when determining if a patent is right for you.

A patent is not a legal right to commercialize an innovation.

A patent is a direct exchange with the government. They offer you the legal right to exclude other people from using, selling, or making what you have claimed within your patent for a fixed period of time, in exchange for a detailed description of your innovation. Essentially, you are offering your cutting-edge knowledge to the public, in trade for the ability to take legal action against anyone, for a limited time, who chooses to infringe on the knowledge you have claimed.

Alternatively, you may have a patent on a certain innovation, but you might not have the freedom to operate within the space without infringing on someone else’s patent. For example, if a widget has three parts, the top, bottom, and middle, and you’ve created a better way to make the middle piece of the widget, you still need to put it together with the top and bottom, which may end up infringing on someone else’s patent.

There is a time limit for the artificial monopoly.

For the majority of countries, a patent is only valid for twenty years, after which, the innovation becomes public domain. Even then, during the time of the patent, the information of your product will be public domain, and likely if its innovative enough, someone may be able to better mimic your product with this knowledge. This is one of the reasons why food and beverage manufacturers tend not to patent their formulations. If Dr. John Pemberton of Coke-Cola decided to patent their formulation back in 1886, the patent would be long expired, by 1906 their secret sauce would be in the public domain, and likely all the coke knock-offs would taste a lot better.

It’s important to decide whether this invention is better suited for a patent or as a trade secret. Trade secrets can last forever, as long as they are kept secret by those who hold the knowledge. For example, it is rumored that KFC’s eleven herbs and spices original recipe, is stored in a vault in the Louisville headquarters, and processes six of the herbs and spices are mixed in one location with a set of staff, and the other five are mixed in a separate location, all to preserve the secret.

Patents are expensive, so they should have a return on investment.

The cost over the lifetime of a patent varies quite a bit depending on the complexity of the innovation, how long and involved the prosecution process is, and the jurisdictions for filing. The cost for filing just in Canada can range anywhere from $4,000 to $6,000 for preparation and filing for a relatively simple invention, but this figure can double, or even triple depending the complexity, and this is just in Canada. If, for example, you wanted to file an international PCT application and then file in multiple jurisdictions during national phase entry, you can easily run a six-figure bill.

With this in mind, it is extremely important to understand how the patent will be put to work. There are many ways to utilize a patent, whether it is for direct licencing, used as a signal of innovation for investors or consumers, or as a defensive move to block others from entering a market. Whatever the reason for patenting, it is important to ensure that it will be able to provide you with tangible benefit.

Now, the question at hand: Should I patent this blog?
The answer doesn’t matter, but even if I think I know, I should probably ask a lawyer.


Sources:
Invents. 2017. Do you have a great invention idea. Retrieved from http://www.invents.com/how-much-does-a-patent-cost/ 
The Times. 2012. The A to Z of friend chicken. Retrieved from https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/the-a-to-z-of-fried-chicken-nrmm3qn0gg7 
Wilson, T. 2012. When to Patent something and how to do it. Globe and Mail. Retrieved from https://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-on-business/small-business/sb-growth/when-to-patent-something-and-how-to-do-it/article626823/?arc404=true 
CNBC. 2008. Colonel’s Secret Recipe Gets Bodygaurds. Retrieved from https://web.archive.org/web/20130923032226/ 
 

Michael Coulson
Analyst, Bioenterprise BC






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Why your food start-up needs a Regulatory Strategy

Posted on September 01 2017 | Author: Dana Baranovsky

Starting a new business in the value add agri-food space comes with its challenges. From product development, funding identification, packaging, marketing, commercialization, and promotion the task at hand is not a simple one.  With so many steps and hurdles between product concept and commercialization, it’s easy to forget a critical step – a regulatory strategy.


What is Regulatory Strategy?

A regulatory strategy aligns with your business timeline. As you progress from milestone to milestone, from product concept to commercialization, you also progress through a regulatory timeline.

It is essential to understand what acts and regulations are relevant to your product. In Canada, Health Canada is responsible for establishing the safety and nutritional requirements for food regulations, while the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) enforces these regulations. Federal regulations such as the Food and Drug Act (FDA) and the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR) must be met by all food manufactures. However, each province may have additional regulations as well. Depending on your food product, there may be specific regulations that affect your product such as the Maple Products Regulations (MPR), Processed Products Regulations (PPR), or Fish Inspection Regulations (FIR) to name a few.

Start-ups in the agri-food space should consider the regulatory requirements from the initial planning stages. Unforeseen regulations can become huge hurdles; setting back projects and can become very costly. For example, if your product is labelled with a non-compliant health claim, it can be pulled from store shelves, and you will have to redesign and order new packaging.


Creating a Regulatory Strategy.

Creating a regulatory strategy can be difficult without any regulatory experience. Entrepreneurs doing their due diligence must search through acts and regulations and find applicable clauses. Fortunately, the CFIA is a great resource for information on food labelling and making health claims.

Regulatory due diligence is a labour intensive process and it is not as appealing as product development or marketing, however it is critical to successful food business.

Once the due diligence is complete, you should formulize a regulatory plan document. The easiest way to stay on track and organize your timelines is to conjointly develop the regulatory plan with your business milestone strategy. At each milestone (e.g. scaling up, commercialization) identify what regulations need to be met, such as food safety, packaging, health claims, etc.

Once your plan is complete, it is highly recommended to have it reviewed by a regulatory expert, who can help identify gaps in your regulatory plan and assist in implementing these recommendations into the regulatory strategy. By creating the regulatory plan yourself, you can save money by engaging a consultant to review your plan rather than create it.


The importance of regulatory strategy for a food business.

As you create your business plan, you should be considering your regulatory strategy. As you move through milestones, you should be checking off the requirements that you are compliant with. Below are some regulations that a food manufacturer may consider.


Product development.

When you are developing a product, be sure to think about what types of ingredients you are using. If you want to use a particular health claim, you must know how much of ingredient ‘x’ needs to be incorporated to use that claim. If you are using food additives, you must ensure that you are using the correct food additive for your product and in the authorized amounts. If you want your product to be labelled gluten-free, you must research different types of third party certifications, the quantity deemed acceptable, and formulate your product accordingly. These are just some examples of considerations that you may make while developing your product.

Product development is a critical time to consider your regulatory strategy. The ingredients you use and their quantities can determine what health claims and third party certifications you can achieve. These claims and certifications can open up new markets and help reach target markets. Your company may also want to consider what ingredients you want to avoid, to make “free-from” claims.


Scaling up.

 It is difficult for food start-ups to implement food safety. Working on a small scale can mean using a commercial kitchen with no food safety certifications, and product demand does not yet reach the minimum run requirements at a co-manufacturing facility. Hence, your product may not qualify at many retailers. Once your company is ready to scale up to a co-manufacturing facility, you need to ensure that the facility has appropriate food safety certifications as well as third party certifications. If you are choosing to build your own facility, you must implement Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), food safety certifications and employee food safety training, to name a few.


Retail.

If your company is considering selling to retailers, you should be aware of the regulatory requirements for food companies listed in their stores. Large retailers will often have their own Good Manufacturing Practices guidelines for their suppliers that can go beyond government regulations.  Failure to comply with retailer regulations can mean you lose your chance at securing a retailer or risk having your product removed from the store.

Export.

 If you are looking to export your product, you must consider the regulatory requirements of the country you are exporting to. Other countries have different standard container sizes, marketing rules, and nutrition labelling requirements.

Knowing federal, provincial, and even retail requirements allows you to effectively plan your go-to-market strategy. Companies who have not considered their regulatory strategy may experience many setbacks, including product reformulations, packaging redesign, and failure to secure retailers. These setbacks are time consuming and costly and can lead to the failure of the business. Thus, regulatory strategy is a key component for the success of your food business.

Sources:
http://ow.ly/9oOv30fbxRB

Dana Baranovsky
Food & Food Systems Analyst






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